Democrats’ losses in Congress may affect Ukraine – US senator

Chris Murphy claims a Republican Congress will ramp down military aid for Kiev

If Republicans win control over the US House or Senate there will be significantly less military aid sent to Ukraine amid the conflict with Russia, claims Democratic Senator Chris Murphy from Connecticut. 

In an interview with The Washington Post on Tuesday Murphy stated that there’s a “real risk” that the $12-billion additional commitment that President Joe Biden’s administration has recently requested could be the last time the US supplies funding to Ukraine.

While Senate Republicans appear supportive of the aid package, Murphy notes that GOP members in the House are more beholden to former US President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly opposed sending billions of dollars in military aid to Kiev.

“His lieutenants in charge of disseminating the message online are kicking the crap out of Ukraine aid,” the Democrat said. 

Many House Republicans have publicly opposed sending military aid to Ukraine, insisting that the money is needed to address unresolved issues back at home. Murphy, however, dismisses these concerns, claiming that many Republicans are simply sympathizing with Russia.

“The MAGA wing of the party, which is the dominant wing, says and thinks a lot of nice things about Putin,” he said.

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The Senator concluded by saying that Ukrainians are making “serious progress” and warned that if Republicans win the House and cut off funding to Kiev it could have “potentially catastrophic impacts” on Ukrainian morale and their “ability to carry the fight.”

Murphy’s comments come ahead of the November 8 midterm elections, where all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 35 of the 100 seats in the US Senate will be contested. 

Democrats, who hold a five-seat majority in the House and a 50-50 split in the Senate are considered to be at a serious risk of losing control over Congress as poll numbers suggest many Americans are dissatisfied with the party’s –and specifically Joe Biden’s– handling of the Covid pandemic and of the ongoing inflation and fuel crises.

While Biden’s approval rating has seen a jump from 36% to 45% since July, the Republican party is nevertheless largely expected to wrestle back control of the House, and some predict it could even take over the Senate as well.